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JC Economics Notes – GCE ‘A’ Level H1/H2 Economics Syllabus

The syllabus for ‘A’ level Economics is divided into microeconomics and macroeconomics. For Singapore, it is also set on H1 or H2 level where H1 level is the basic level with lesser chapters taught while the scope of study for H2 will cover the whole syllabus set by SEAB.
It is also important to take note that different junior colleges have different paces on how the syllabus is being taught over the two years and thus, the pace of development can be classified into Type I or II. (Please refer to the structure of programme at economicsfocus.com.sg for more details). Most of the junior colleges are teaching Type I structure except for RI (Humanities), NYJC, HCI, AJC.
Different junior colleges have different headings and sub-headings for the chapters and this may be confusing for students to understand the development of syllabus. The depth of the respective chapters is also dealt differently by different junior colleges.
As Economics at ‘A’ level is taught on the applied framework, it is imperative for students to develop business and economic acumen about the industries, local, regional global economies to facilitate application.
The syllabus for the H1 or H2 ‘A’ level Economics seen as follows:

Level

H2 student

H1 Student

Yr 1
  1. Central Economic Problems
  2. Demand and Supply and Government Regulation
  3. Elasticity of Demand and Supply
  4. Theory of Firm (Cost of Production)
  5. Market Structure
  6. Market Failures
  1. Central Economic Problems
  2. Demand and Supply and Government Regulation
  3. Elasticity of Demand and Supply

(Only Price Elasticity of Demand and Supply is taught)

  1. Market Failures
Yr 2
  1. Economic Indicators / National Income Accounting
  2. National Income Determination
  3. Economic Growth
  4. Inflation
  5. Unemployment
  6. Aims of Government and Policies
  7. International Trade
  8. Balance of Payments
  9. Foreign Exchange
  10. Globalization
  1. Economic Indicators / National Income Accounting
  2. Economic Growth
  3. Inflation
  4. Unemployment
  5. Aims of Government and Policies
  6. International Trade
  7. Balance of Payments
  8. Foreign Exchange
  9. Globalization

This article is contributed by Mr. Simon Ng, founder and principal JC Economics Tutor of Economicsfocus, who has 20 years of teaching experience. Currently, Mr. Simon Ng provides specialized Economics Tuition and GP Tuition. To read more articles on Economics issues and skills development, please refer to the JC Economics Essays blog.